Facebook (and others) Shares Identifiable Information with Advertisers

In Facebook’s vice president for public policy Elliot Schrage's infamous Q&A session with the New York Times readers, he made this statement: The privacy implications of our ads, unfortunately, appear to be widely misunderstood. People assume we’re sharing or even…

Facebook’s Zuckerberg: “Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity”

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg has a history of speaking his mind on privacy, and what he speaks is often fraught with problems, ignorance, and arrogance. But, today, I found a new statement that brings Zuckerberg's hubris to a new level: “Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity.” According to Zuckerberg, the person responsible for the world's most popular website for sharing information about oneself, wanting to manage your flows of information in such a way that might present a different version of your "complete" self to your friends, family, co-workers, and more distant friends shows a lack of integrity. Zuckerberg must have skipped that class where Jung and Goffman were discussed...

Another Facebook Exec Talks About Privacy; Another Set of Gross Misunderstandings

In an attempt to stem the rising outrage over its most recent round of privacy failures — Instant Personalization & Connections — Facebook's vice president for public policy, Elliot Schrage, answered readers questions at The New York Times's Bits blog. As with other corporate expressions of Facebook's approach to privacy, his answers reveal a gross misunderstanding of the nature of privacy in our (social) networked world.

What Happens to Your Facebook Data When You Leave? (Updated)

Like many, I am considering leaving Facebook due to its most recent round of privacy failures -- Instant Personalization & Connections -- which represent only the latest in a continuing de-evolution of privacy protection on the popular social networking platform.…

Yet Again, Facebook Misunderstands Privacy

Facebook recently announced a variety of proposed changes to its Privacy Policy and Statement of Rights and Responsibilities. The changes to these governing documents point to the following matters, each with its own unique privacy implications: hints of a new location-based service, clarifying that sharing with "Everyone" means everyone, and, most notably, that Facebook may share your visible data directly with certain third party websites. This final point has gotten significant attention, but would like to point out a few aspects of Facebook's new language that reveals -- yet again -- that Facebook simply fails to understand the nature of privacy, especially in our online information ecosystem.

Why Pete Warden Should Not Release Profile Data on 215 Million Facebook Users

Speaking of the research ethics related to automatically harvesting public social networking data, we are confronted this week with the story of Pete Warden, a former Apple engineer who has spent the last six months harvesting and analyzing data from…

Revisiting Research Ethics in the Facebook Era: Challenges in Emerging CSCW Research

I'm currently in Savannah, GA to participate in a workshop on Revisiting Research Ethics in the Facebook Era: Challenges in Emerging CSCW Research at CSCW 2010. This is my first time at CSCW, and looking at the set of papers…

Call for Panelists: On the Philosophy of Facebook (AoIR 2010, Gothenburg)

I am proposing a panel for Internet Research 11.0 titled "On the Philosophy of Facebook". Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg has built his social networking empire on the belief that "information wants to be shared", a particular philosophy of information that directly impacts the values built into the design of Facebook, ranging from its user interface, privacy policies, terms of service, and method of governance. This panel will explore the philosophy of Facebook and its broader implications for norms of privacy, identity, governance, sociability, and online life generally.

Michael Arrington is Wrong about Privacy, Too

Responding to the brouhaha caused by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s recent proclamation that social norms on privacy have loosened, Michael Arrington (the tech blogger who was interviewing Zuckerberg at the time) has posted a piece on his blog Tech Crunch:…