Information Society Series Book: Interfaces on Trial 2.0

I'm pleased to announce that the first book in the MIT Press "Information Society Series" I am co-editing with Laura DeNardis has been released: Interfaces on Trial 2.0 By Jonathan Band and Masanobu Katoh March 2011 ISBN-10: 0-262-01500-5 ISBN-13: 978-0-262-01500-4…

Intellectual Freedom vs. WikiLeaks (Feb 24, Brookfield Public Library)

Building from the successful event on Minding the Gaps: WikiLeaks and Internet Security in the 21st Century held at UW-Milwaukee, I will be joining my colleague Dr. Joyce Latham to discuss Intellectual Freedom vs. WikiLeaks at the Brookfield Public Library…

The Next Digital Decade: Essays on the Future of the Internet

I'm pleased to announce that the publication of The Next Digital Decade: Essays on the Future of the Internet—a unique collaboration among 26 thought leaders on Internet law, philosophy, policy and economics from a wide variety of perspectives. I feel…

Anthony Hoffmann: Asserting Rights Online

[This three-part post is authored by SOIS PhD student Anthony Hoffmann; access other student posts here.]   Asserting Rights Online, Part I: Online Intermediaries and “Digital Citizenship” Recently, Danielle Citron has initiated a discussion at Concurring Opinions regarding the subject…

Liza Barry-Kessler: Internet Neutrality Principles Should Apply to Wireless Providers

[This post is authored by SOIS PhD student Liza Barry-Kessler; access other student posts here.] The FCC recently announced that it will vote on “preserving the open Internet” at its December 21, 2010 meeting. This will be a high profile…

Debrief: Internet Research 11.0 Conference (Gothenburg, Sweden)

Last week I attended Internet Research 11.0: Sustainability, Participation, Action, the 11th annual  conference for the Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR), in Gothenburg, Sweden. This is the conference I look forward to the most each year, thanks to the steady…

Google Acquires Like.com, and its Facial Recognition Technology

It was confirmed last week that Google is acquiring Like.com, a visual search engine that focuses on helping people shop for clothing and accessories online. While most stories are spinning this as Google's attempt to improve its product search engine…

Google on Wi-Fi Privacy Invasions: “No Harm, No Foul”

Recently we learned that Google's Street View vehicles gathered people's private communications on their home WiFi networks as they drove by snapping photos. Initially, Google denied it was collecting or storing any payload data, but later admitted that it had, in…

Google’s “New Approach” to China isn’t to End Censorship, But Simply to Leave

Starting today, users visiting Google.cn will be redirected to Google.com.hk, Google’s Hong Kong search portal, where search results will be provided free from the filtering Google had previously been performing on Google.cn. Google is touting this as ending censorship in China, but, as Siva Vaidhyanathan has pointed out, that really isn’t the case. It’s an end-around. A slight-of-hand. While Google is trying to do the right thing here, and it hopes it can deliver unfiltered results to China from Google.com.hk (or force China to take some kind of action against the Hong Kong site). But I fear this move will instead result in further failure to serve the interests of Chinese Internet users, and another lost opportunity to fight oppressive online censorship.

Event: Emerging Privacy and Ethical Challenges for Libraries in the 2.0 Era

From May 2 through May 8, 2010, libraries across the nation will celebrate Choose Privacy Week for the first time. This American Library Association campaign invites library professionals, users, and friends into a national conversation about privacy rights in a…