“Security Through Obscurity”

(via TechDirt, via The Raw Feed)A John Hopkins University student conducted a Google ego search recently and discovered that information she provided for the campus’s “J-CARD” student debit card system was posted online — along with data from 4,000 other…

Photo Finder: Automated Facial Recognition on Facebook

Amateur facial recognition technology is coming to Facebook. Face.com is launching a facial recognition application called Photo Finder to allow Facebook users to search their photos — and photos of their friends — to learn, recognize, and tag familiar faces.…

The Illusion of “Private” Web Content

Millions of Web 2.0 users share their personal information, photos, bookmarks, and lives online. And, of course, various concerns arise about the fact that so much (what was once considered) private information is being publicly shared with anyone with an…

WSJ: When Public Records Are Too Public

Jason Fry, a columnist for the Wall Street Journal, writes about the increasing lack of “security via obscurity” as more and more public records become searchable online. While this is old news for many of us, it’s nice to see…

Search Can Be Your Enemy

CIO.com features this column about how the reach of search engines shatters the myth of “security through obscurity”: A month or so ago, I was on the phone with Leonard Fuld, who’s known for his work in competitive intelligence, about…

Public Comments on RFID Passports are…Public

The government’s plans to institute passports with RFID chips were open for public comment since last February. The public feedback was overwhelmingly negative, noting concerns over both security and privacy. In an odd bit of irony, most of the public…

What if Google Enabled FOIA Requests?

I’m attending the “Regulating Search?” symposium hosted by the Yale Information Society Project today. The first panel was on “The Search Space,” and Robin Sloan, co-producer of the (in)famous “EPIC 2014” movie on “the future history of media,” posed an…