Search results: web 2.0 privacy

Flickrblockers: Protect Your Web 2.0 Privacy

Is Web 2.0 is cramping your social life? Tired of having your awkward drunken slips of judgment splashed across the web on Flickr or Facebook? Take back your privacy with Flickrblockers. Using Flickrblockers you can be the life of the party without worrying about the plague of incriminating evidence showing up on Flickr the following […]

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4S: Privacy and Surveillance in Web 2.0

I am currently attending the annual meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science in Montreal. Earlier today I had the pleasure of participating on a panel I co-organized with Anders Albrechtslund titled, “Ways Knowing Everything About Each Other: Critical Perspectives on Web 2.0 and Social Networking.” Here are the first few paragraphs of […]

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Privacy and Surveillance in Web 2.0: Unintended Consequences and the Rise of “Netaveillance”

[This thought piece appears on the On The Identity Trail project's blog, blog*on*nymity. Thanks to the amazing folks there for the (second) invitation to contribute to the project. -mz] This post is an attempt to collect and organize some thoughts on how the rise of so-called Web 2.0 technologies bear on privacy and surveillance studies. […]

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Why Web 2.0 will end your privacy

Wil Harris at bit-tech.net has written an excellent essay summarizing the privacy threats of Web 2.0. A choice nugget: Why are the companies worth so much money? Why is MySpace worth over half a billion dollars without a proper revenue model? Why is Digg allegedly pitched at over $20m (at the last count) without any […]

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Privacy, Web 2.0 and Photographing Strangers – Wired has it Wrong

The rise of camera phones, blogs and photo sharing sites like Flickr means people are frequently taking pictures of complete strangers in public places and posting them on the web. A reader asks Wired magazine if that’s a violation of privacy: I sometimes snap pictures of strangers and post them on my blog and Flickr. […]

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Washington Post Essay: Mark Zuckerberg’s theory of privacy

This week marks the 10th anniversary of Facebook, and to help commemorate this milestone I wrote an essay for The Washington Post that postulates an early framework of Mark Zuckerberg’s theory of privacy, based on a preliminary analysis of the data contained in The Zuckerberg Files archive. Here are the three principles I discuss: Information […]

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Ohio State University Library Colloquium: “Is Library User Privacy still Paramount in the 2.0 Era?”

I’ve been invited by the Ohio State University Libraries to contribute to an ongoing campus-wide series of Conversations on Morality, Politics, and Society (COMPAS). This year’s theme is “Public/Private“, and I will be presenting today on the topic  “Is Library User Privacy still Paramount in the 2.0 Era?”. Abstract and slides are below. Traditionally, the context […]

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New Publications on Privacy and Library 2.0

I’m pleased to announce two recent publications of my work exploring the implications of Library 2.0 platforms and applications for patron privacy. These represent early thinking on this complex relationship between privacy and web-based delivery of library services, and I intend to continue investigating this through a multidisciplinary assessment of the motivations, design, deployment, and impact […]

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Chronicle: “As Libraries Go Digital, Sharing of Data Is at Odds With Tradition of Privacy”

The Chronicle of Higher Education has published an excellent article by Marc Parry on “As Libraries Go Digital, Sharing of Data Is at Odds With Tradition of Privacy,” noting that as libraries are beginning to collect and share patron data to build tools for recommending and discovering books, important concerns over patron privacy emerge, which […]

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How to Adjust your Facebook Privacy Settings – 2012 Edition

The 2012 edition of Choose Privacy Week, the annual initiative of the American Library Association that invites the public into a national conversation about privacy rights in a digital age, is wrapping up (and don’t miss our special screening of the short documentary film “Big Brother, Big Business: The Data-Mining and Surveillance Industries” tomorrow at […]

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